GRADE 12 

SELECT YOUR AREA OF INTEREST

HFA4U NUTRITION AND HEALTH – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

HFA4U online examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. In HFA4U online, students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

UNIT ONE

Nutrition and Health

Essential Question: How does the body use food to provide energy?

  • In this unit, students will learn about nutrients, the specific components that make-up food, and the impact that they have on health. Students will explore Canadian food guidelines and those around the world. They will also analyze their own diet!

UNIT TWO

Food Preparation Skills

Essential Question: How can accidents in the kitchen be prevented? How can food safely be handled to avoid food-borne illnesses?

  • In this unit, students will get to step into the kitchen and get their hands dirty! Students will learn some new skills and get creative by coming up with their own recipes.

UNIT THREE

Eating Patterns and Trends

Essential Question: How do nutritional needs change throughout the lifespan?

  • In this unit, students will learn about the way nutritional needs change throughout a person’s growth and development. Students will also learn about the powerful connection between nutrition and disease and about trends in food production and consumption.

UNIT FOUR

Local and Global Issues

Essential Question: In what way is the environment affected by food production and how can we minimize negative effects on the environment?

  • In this unit, students will explore food-related issues at the local and global levels. Students will also analyze strategies for combating both. Environmental issues related to food production and transportation and the influence consumers will be analyzed.

CULMINATING PROJECT

15% of Final Grade

  • This project is one of the final evaluations of HFA4U online. In this project, students will use everything they learned about nutrition, food preparation, eating trends, and food-related issues. This project is worth 15% of the final grade.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

15% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HFA4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

HHS4U FAMILIES IN CANADA – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

HHS4U online enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyze the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. In HHS4U online, students will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

UNIT ONE

Families and Theoretical Perspectives

Essential Question: What makes a successful family? Does the definition differ depending on the culture?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the family. What has the family looked like in the past? What do Canadian families look like today? Why has the family changed? What is the purpose of families? Students will also be introduced to social science theories. These theories form a foundation for the course and will be applied to the topics studied in the course.

UNIT TWO

Individuals

Essential Question: How and when can one prepare for adulthood?

  • In this unit, students will explore the path to adulthood for individuals by examining the history of teenagers, young adults and seniors in society. Various theories that attempt to explain the processes of maturation, individualization and socialization will be examined. The topics of education and employment will also be studied.

UNIT THREE

Social Science Research

Essential Question: How can research influence the development of the family?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to social science research, from how to pick a topic to how to write annotated bibliographies, essays, and reports. Students will learn how to do primary and secondary research, practice and demonstrate their note-taking abilities, and continue to develop their APA formatting skills.

UNIT FOUR

Couples

Essential Question: What makes a successful marriage? How can one create an optimal environment for maintaining healthy relationship?

  • In this unit, students will explore the development of couple relationships from dating to cohabitation to marriage. The issues that are explored in this unit include divorce, role negotiation, arranged marriage intermarriage, and same-sex marriage.

UNIT FIVE

Parent-Child Relationships

Essential Question: What are the most successful types of parenting? Is there one kind of parenting style that elicits the best results?

  • In this unit, students will examine the relationship between parents and their children. How can society balance the needs of parents and children? What is society’s obligation to parents and children? At the end of the unit child, spousal and elder abuse is examined to help students recognize the signs.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

30% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HHS4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

HNB4M THE WORLD OF FASHION – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university, college, or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

GRADE: 12 (University/College)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

HNB4M online gives students the opportunity to explore the world of fashion. Students will learn how to create a fashion product using various tools, techniques, and technologies while developing their practical skills. Students will learn about various factors that affect the global fashion industry, the needs of specialized markets, and the impact of fibre and fabric production and care. In addition, they will learn about social and historical influences on fashion. Students will apply research skills when investigating aspects of the fashion world.

UNIT ONE

Introduction and Research - What is Fashion?

Essential Question: What is fashion? What are occupations and ideologies in within the modern World of Fashion?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the World of Fashion. Students will develop critical thinking and research skills. Students will cover topics such as famous designers and their contributions to the industry, the function of fashion within many fields such as film, the industry itself and careers within it, theories surrounding fashion and social sciences, APA formatting via basic, in-text, and referencing.

UNIT TWO

Influences on Fashion

Essential Question: What factors influence fashion beyond personal taste? How do elements such as history, culture, and technology play a role in the development and function of fashion?

  • In this unit, students will learn about trends in the world and how culture and history shape fashion and textile designs. Students will learn about haute couture, fashion houses, fashion centres. Students will also explore the tools and Technologies that impact the world of fashion (synthetic fibres, weaving, overlock serger, etc.). Students will examine trends, styles, fads and fashion cycles. They will also study the historical Influences on Fashion influenced by (climate, gender norms, proximity, access to materials, politics, etc.).

UNIT THREE

Globalization, Environmentalism, and Social Sciences

Essential Question: How is fashion globalized? How am I a factor in production, consumption and environmentalism?

  • In this unit, students will learn about how fashion is a social science. Students will explore how Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology connect to fashion, as well as how specialized markets need specific tools, cuts, and fabrics. Students will examine how the fashion industry is the second largest polluter on earth, and how they contribute to that issue.

UNIT FOUR

Design and Upcycling

Essential Question: How do I create or upcycle my own products?

  • In this unit, students will be given a glimpse inside the world of fashion design. Students will create a look-book and explore their own closet. Students will create or upcycle their own products, as well as learn and use safety precaution procedures. Students will learn and demonstrate Colour Theory and elements and principles of design, as well as create, demonstrate, and teach others how to create and use fashion products.

CULMINATING PROJECT

20% of Final Grade

 

  • This project is one of the final evaluations of HNB4M online. This project will challenge students to apply all the knowledge and skills they have developed over the course, and will be worth 20% of the final grade.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

10% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HNB4M online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours

HSB4U CHALLENGE & CHANGE IN SOCIETY – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

HSB4U online focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyze how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyze causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. In HSB4U online, students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

UNIT ONE

Social Science Research and Inquiry Skills

Essential Question: What skills will I need to create social science reports?

  • In this unit, students will learn about APA formatting and the social science inquiry model. Students will learn how to propose a research question and formulate a hypothesis. Students will also learn about social science field work.

UNIT TWO

Foundations for the Study of Social Change

Essential Question: What are the differences between Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology? What are patterns of social change?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to psychology, sociology and anthropology. Students will learn how different cultures and changes in society are studied in these fields. Students will examine different schools of thought within these fields, as well as define theories of change.

UNIT THREE

Causes and Effects of Social Change

Essential Question: What are the factors that cause and effect social change?

  • In this unit, students will learn about influential leaders who have changed the world. Students will also take a closer look at the effects of social conformity and alienation on social change. Students will also take a look at the effects of poverty and affluence on social change as well as the effects of technology.

UNIT FOUR

Social Patterns and Trends

Essential Question: What social patterns and trends exist in Canada?

  • In this unit, students will examine demographics and social determinants. Students will discuss two examples of the theories that consider how the era a person is born in influences social change. Students will investigate social trends and the Canadian census as well as examine social deviance from various perspectives.

UNIT FIVE

Global Social Challenges

Essential Question: What challenges are individuals and groups facing as the world becomes more interconnected?

  • In this unit, students will examine social challenges related to the global distribution of wealth and resources. Students will discuss theories of globalization and its effects on the world. Students will investigate inequality and the exploitation of various peoples and nations from a variety of perspectives.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

30% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HSB4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

HSE4M EQUITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE – GRADE 12

PREREQUISITE: Any university, college, or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

GRADE: 12 (University/ College)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

 

HSE4M online enables students to develop an understanding of the theoretical, social, and historical underpinnings of various equity and social justice issues and to analyze strategies for bringing about positive social change. Students will learn about historical and contemporary equity and social justice issues in Canada and globally. They will explore power relations and the impact of a variety of factors on equity and social justice. Students will develop and apply research skills and will design and implement a social action initiative relating to an equity or social justice issue.

UNIT ONE

From Theory: Foundations of Equity and Social Justice

Essential Question: Why is social justice important? What is our role as global citizens? What makes us different and/or the same?

 

  • In this unit, students will explore the foundations of equity and social justice. Students will learn the language they need to discuss social issues, become exposed to the theories that inform equity issues, and begin to explore specific Canadian and global issues that have informed and continue to challenge social justice practice.

UNIT TWO

Power and Privilege

Essential Question: What does it mean to have power and privilege? Is power important? Where does power and privilege come from?

  • In this unit, students will explore the concepts of power and privilege, and how they support the framework of societies and how we interact with each other. Students will examine their own role in the power and privilege dynamics that shape their daily lives and challenge notions about where power comes from and how it used as both a destructive and building force.

UNIT THREE

Media and Social Justice

Essential Question: Is the media a force for good or bad? How do my media interactions matter? Whose voices are broadcast (or silenced) through traditional media means?

  • In this unit, students will begin examining the media with a critical eye, and explore how different media forms play a role in reinforcing and challenging social structures. Students will take an inward look by evaluating their media participation and try strategies that challenge media message and encourage them to seek out new perspectives.

UNIT FOUR

Social Justice and You

Essential Question: Why do I want the world to change What is change worth What will I do to make change in the world?

  • In this unit, students will begin taking a personal approach to social justice and activism. This will require students to explore their own experiences and motivations and identify which areas of social justice are most important to them. Students will explore the role art has in self-expression, and the role it can have as activism. Students will also examine how self-care is an important consideration in order to make social justice work effective and sustainable.

UNIT FIVE

To Action: Making Change towards Equity

Essential Question: Whose job is it to make social change? What issues do I care about most?

  • In this unit, students will start taking the step required to make a real social change. Students will look at what it takes to make the commitment to make social change a viable and sustainable part of being an informed, active citizen. Students will also complete a major research paper in order to dig deeper into an issue they care about.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

30% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HSE4M online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours. 

HZT4U PHILOSOPHY:

QUESTIONS & THEORIES – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

HZT4U online enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, aesthetics). Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. In HZT4U online, students will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.

UNIT ONE

Research and Inquiry Skills & Philosophical Foundations

Essential Question: How do we know what is true? How does society influence philosophical thought?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to a variety of topics related to philosophy as well as some of the major philosophical questions that have enticed philosophers for centuries. Students will also begin to learn about the nature of philosophy, that is, the main branches of philosophy as well as develop an understanding of the components of a philosophical argument.

UNIT TWO

Metaphysics

Essential Question: What is the meaning of life? What is the self? Do we have free will?

  • In this unit, students will explore the branch of philosophy known as metaphysics which attempts to determine what exists and the basic structure of reality. Students will gain an understanding of some of the major questions of metaphysics such as “What are the ultimate constituents of reality?” “What is the meaning of life?” “What is the self?” and “Do we have free will?”

UNIT THREE

Ethics

Essential Question: What is a "good" life? Are there objective standards for determining good and evil, right and wrong? Why should we act ethically?

  • In this unit, students will examine ethics. Ethics is the study of how we should live our lives and how we should treat others. Students will examine major philosophical questions such as “What is a good life?” “Are there objective standards for determining good and evil, right and wrong?” and “Why should we act ethically?”

UNIT FOUR

Social and Political Philosophy

Essential Question: Do all people have the right to equal treatment? What limits, if any, should be put on the freedom of an individual citizen? What are an individual’s rights and responsibilities?

  • In this unit, students will explore social and political philosophy. Social and political philosophy is the study of the fundamental principles of society and the state. Major questions students will explore in this unit include “What are the just limits of state authority?” “Do all people have the right to equal treatment?” “What limits, if any, should be put on the freedom of an individual citizen?” and “What are an individual’s rights and responsibilities?”

UNIT FIVE

Aesthetics

Essential Question: What is beauty? What is art? Should art have social value, and, if so, how is its social value determined? Are aesthetic judgements subjective or objective?

  • In this unit, students will learn about Aesthetics. This branch of philosophy studies art and beauty. But, what is beauty? What is art? Throughout this unit students will explore major philosophical questions such as “Should art have social value, and, if so, how is its social value determined?” “Is art a uniquely human endeavour?” “Are aesthetic judgements subjective or objective?” and “Can propaganda be art?”

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

30% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of HZT4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

ICS4U COMPUTER SCIENCE – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

ICS4U online enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyze algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field.

UNIT ONE

Programming in Java

Essential Question: What is Java? How do we work with data types? How do we code condition and control structures?

  • In this unit, students will review programming basics, and work in Java using the Netbeans IDE. Students will learn about data types, commenting, and arrays. Students will also research the impact of computers on the environment.

UNIT TWO

Modular Programming

Essential Question: What is Object Oriented Programming? How do we read and write to files? How do we use industry standard testing and documentation?

 

  • In this unit, students will learn about Object Oriented Programming, how to read and write to files, and how to use industry standards for testing and documenting.

UNIT THREE

Arrays and Algorithm Analysis

Essential Question: How can we make and work with two dimensional arrays? How do we determine how long an algorithm will take to run and choose an efficient algorithm?

  • In this unit, students will investigate efficient ways to search and sort arrays. Students will learn about two-dimensional arrays and how to calculate the worst case time an algorithm takes to run.

UNIT FOUR

Recursion and Project Management

Essential Question: How can we write recursive methods effectively? How can we make Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) in java? What are some standard project management tools, and can can we use them to manage a software development project?

  • In this unit, students will learn how to write recursive methods, make GUIs, and manage projects.

CULMINATING PROJECT

10% of Final Grade

  • This project is one of the final evaluations of ICS4U online. This project will challenge students to use all the concepts they have learned throughout this course and is worth 10% of the final grade.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

20% of Final Grade

  • This exam is the final evaluation of ICS4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

UNIT ONE

The Nature of Artificial Intelligence

Essential Question: What is artificial intelligence? Have humans created real AI? How can we test possible AI to decide?

  • In this unit, students will research the history of Artificial Intelligence. They will analyze early criteria for testing for Artificial Intelligence as well as criticism of the criteria, and other arguments about how we define AI. They will also complete lessons, readings, discussions a quiz and an assignment.

UNIT TWO

Review of Fundamental Skills

Essential Question: What are key programming skills needed to explore artificial intelligence?

  • In this unit, students will review programming basics in Python. They will be able to explore and fully understand the statement: “Python is simple, powerful and versatile programming language used in web development, data analysis, artificial intelligence, and much more”.

UNIT THREE

Linear Regression

Essential Question: How can we use linear regression to create machine learning?

  • In this unit, students will study and implement linear regression and related topics, such as hypotheses, cost functions and gradient descent. Students will analyze large datasets and begin to gain insights into the relationships within the data. Students will learn how to optimize the learning rate of their models to improve their accuracy. Students will automate the discovery of trends in multi-dimensional data.

UNIT FOUR

Logistic Regression

Essential Question: How can we use logistic regression to create machine learning?

  • In this unit, students will study and implement logistic regression, a more advanced machine learning model that can comprehend more complex relationships within data. Students will cover the new features of hypotheses, the cost function and gradient descent. Students will also learn how to prepare data for efficient, accurate machine learning. Students will engage in problem-solving to optimize the accuracy of their models using feature normalization and regularization. Students will create a binary classifier to predictively sort data into different categories.

UNIT FIVE

Artificial Neural Networks

Essential Question: How can we create artificial neural networks?

 

  • In this unit, students will study the fundamentals of neural networks, the technology powering modern AI, and customize a pre-built neural network to classify data with greater accuracy. Students will learn how to modify a neural network to classify different types of data for different purposes (i.e. recognizing cats in photos vs. predicting diabetes from patient records). Students will practice industry-standard machine learning development methods, including data pipelines, data collection and cleaning, and model validation.

UNIT SIX

Implications of Artificial Intelligence

Essential Question: How could artificial intelligence impact our future?

  • In this unit, students will critically evaluate the effects of artificial intelligence in the modern age. Students will synthesize different viewpoints about the ethical implications of artificial intelligence in business, politics, and law, and persuasively communicate their own perspective. Students will creatively explore the potential applications and changing limitations of artificial intelligence, and compare their current opinions to the conclusions they made in the first unit of the course.

CULMINATING PROJECT

30% of Final Grade

  • This project is the final evaluation of IDC4U Artificial Intelligence. This project will challenge students to use all concepts learned throughout this course and is worth 30% of the final grade.

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

In this course, students will learn about blockchain history, business models, use cases, and innovation for the next course of future global developments. Blockchain technology will help students combine the skills required for and knowledge of different subjects and disciplines to solve problems, make decisions, create personal meaning, and present findings beyond the scope of a single subject or discipline. Through individual and collaborative inquiry and research, students will analyze the connections among diverse subjects and disciplines; develop information literacy skills in analyzing, selecting, evaluating, and communicating information; and become aware of a variety of blockchain resources and viewpoints on technological issues. Students will also examine their own learning styles and lifestyles, relate their inquiries and research to global situations, and investigate career opportunities in blockchain technology.

UNIT ONE

Bitcoins and Altcoins

Essential Question: How does blockchain technology change our world?

  • In this unit, students will learn about how blockchain technology creates coins to attribute value to the blockchain network. Students will be given the tools to analyze and monitor a growing number of coins.

UNIT TWO

Blockchain Explorers and Use Cases

Essential Question: How can I use the block explorer to better understand how a blockchain works?

  • In this unit, students will learn how digital currencies operate on the blockchain, and what a blockchain is in more detail by searching transaction data, blockchain addresses, and understanding how cryptocurrencies operate on a blockchain. Students will also learn how to use the blockchain in real life by sending and receiving Synchrolife restaurant food tokens. These transactions will be logged to the Ethereum blockchain, and students will be required to report on their transactions as part of a blockchain learning process. Being involved and integrated into the blockchain is just as important as studying what it does.

UNIT THREE

Powering the Blockchain

Essential Question: How is global power consumption affected by machines used to power the blockchain?

  • In this unit, students will learn how blockchains are powered, and what this means for power consumption around the globe. Can the blockchain be environmentally friendly? Students will also explore the concept of mining Bitcoin and Altcoins, speculative pricing, mining calculators, electricity costs, the concept of efficiency, and how a growing blockchain can be both good and bad for business.

UNIT FOUR

Blockchain Evolution

Essential Question: How is cryptocurrency affecting society?

  • In this unit, students will research the concepts of space and place and how coin usage can vary by geography. Even though cryptocurrency is for the most part border-less (anyone anywhere can use it), usage of certain coins is favoured in certain areas (due to social influences within geo-regions). Here students will look at real-world projects that use blockchains, and try to make sense of them in a Canadian context.

UNIT FIVE

Using the Blockchain for Business

Essential Question: How does the blockchain revolutionize the way businesses are created and managed?

  • In this unit, students will discover why the blockchain is an active model for developing business.

CULMINATING PROJECT

30% of Final Grade

  • This project is the final evaluation of IDC4U Blockchain Technology. This project will challenge students to use all concepts learned throughout this course and is worth 30% of the final grade.

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: DATA SCIENCE – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies (IDC4U) courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple IDC4U courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each IDC4U course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only IDC4U course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

UNIT ONE

Theory & Foundation: Introduction to DSW, Intro to R, Basic Stats

Essential Question: How is Talent Acquisition shaped by Data Science?

  • In this unit, students will be given a human resources case study for a North American data analytics consulting company called Fireside Analytics Inc. The company has received thousands of resumes for a manager position it is seeking to fill. Students will be given the task to use publicly available data from Statistics Canada data to analyze the relationship between university degree studies and average salary.

UNIT TWO

Processes: Text Analytics & Word Clouds

Essential Question: What are ways that data mining data visualization can provide relevant information?

  • In this unit, students will be given a human resources case study for a North American data analytics consulting company called Fireside Analytics Inc. The company has received thousands of resumes for a manager position it is seeking to fill. Students will be given the task to use data science tools and text analysis to screen the resumes.

UNIT THREE

Methods of Research: The Classic Churn Case in Data Science

Essential Question: How do you do predictive modelling and segment data by progressive attribute selection?

  • In this unit, students are tasked with identifying the characteristics of “churning” music students (those that dropped out after 2 months). Neo Avant-Garde (Neo) is a North American private high school for teenage learners working towards entering the first year at the top universities in the world. In recent years, the teaching staff at Neo have noticed students dropping out of the music program.

UNIT FOUR

Implementation and Impacts: International Business Fundamentals

Essential Question: How do businesses stay competitive in the global market using Data Science?

  • In this unit, students will complete a case study that involves mapping Canada’s imports and exports data, illustrating trends in trade volume, and Canada’s trading partners. Students will learn about the different types of graphs available for displaying their data, the pros and cons of each of these graphs as well as bias in graphs.

CULMINATING PROJECT

30% of Final Grade

  • This project is the final evaluation of IDC4U Data Science online. For this project, students will apply any of the concepts they have learned in the course to analyze the data. This project is worth 30% of the final grade.

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: THE ELITE ATHLETE – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies (IDC4U) courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple IDC4U courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each IDC4U course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only IDC4U course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

IDC4U The Elite Athlete is designed for students who will pursue their athletic goals after secondary school, be it inter-collegiate sports, provincial, national, or international competition. Students will explore topics such as Managing Social Media, Sports Journalism & Strategic Athletic Marketing, Ethics for Elite Athletes, Leadership, Building and Maintaining Financial Security, and Time Management. In IDC4U The Elite Athlete, students will uncover and apply areas of interest to elite athletes in all of these areas.

UNIT ONE

Managing Social Media

Essential Question: What are ways that an elite athlete can leverage social media for their personal brand?

  • In this unit, students will be provided with an opportunity to explore the use of Social Media for elite athletes, including the history, appropriate uses, and the benefits and dangers of using Social Media as an elite athlete. There are a variety of learning materials including module lessons, visual aids, video, and interactive learning. Activity tasks will include Assignments, Discussion Forums, Quizzes, and Surveys which will be graded and returned to students with feedback. This is designed to enhance students learning experience in an effective and efficient manner that promotes further learning.

UNIT TWO

Sports Journalism

Essential Question: What are the trends in sports journalism, and how can the elite athlete be aware of the media spotlight?

  • In this unit, students will have the opportunity to explore the Evolution of Sports Journalism and Mass Media & Sports Journalism. Students will learn about sports reporting and writing, as well as the internet, social media and athlete journalism. Students will also analyze the future of Sports Reporting.

UNIT THREE

Ethics for Elite Athletes

Essential Question: What are ethical considerations to be aware of as an elite athlete?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to ethics and a variety of different ethical theories introduced by different philosophers. Students will learn how ethics plays a role in sports as well as the different ethical/moral theories relating to sport.

UNIT FOUR

Building and Maintaining Financial Security

Essential Question: How can athletes properly plan for financial lifestyle during and after their athletic career?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to Financial Security and financial planning for Elite Athletes. Students will learn successful budgeting techniques and the basics of investments and endorsements. Students will also learn how to plan for retirement.

UNIT FIVE

Time Management

Essential Question: What are time management techniques that can help the elite athlete be efficient, yet focus on their sport?

  • In this unit, students will explore time management skills and tips as well as the core principles of time management. Students will examine strategies to enhance personal time management skills and gain awareness of available time management tools.

UNIT SIX

Leadership

Essential Question: What are leadership strategies that are critical to individual and team success as an elite athlete?

  • In this unit, students will have the opportunity to explore the essence of leadership and effective leadership skills for athletes. Students will examine defining characteristics of leadership for Elite Athletes and how athletes are professional leaders.

CULMINATING PROJECT

30% of Final Grade

  • This project is the final evaluation of IDC4U The Elite Athlete. This project will challenge students to use the knowledge and skills gained throughout this course. It is worth 30% of the final grade.

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:

MUSEUM STUDIES – GRADE 12

PREREQUISITE: Any university or university/college preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies (IDC4U) courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple IDC4U courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each IDC4U course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only IDC4U course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

UNIT ONE

What are Museums?

Essential Question: How are museums interdisciplinary organizations?

 

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the main ideas and issues involved in museum studies. Students will consider the question “What are museums?” and be able to answer it by the end of the unit with reference to specific fields of study. Students will start to learn about the principal museum of the course: the world-renowned Art Gallery of Ontario. Students will start by looking at the history of museums and the role of museums. By the end of the unit, students will understand how museums are interdisciplinary institutions that combine a variety of fields, specifically visual arts, architecture and marketing in order to be successful.

UNIT TWO

Topics in Museums

Essential Question: What are the purposes of museum collections?

  • In this unit, students will explore the content of museum collections and exhibits. Students will specifically examine a variety of online museum collections, include the Google Arts and Culture project, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s virtual timeline. Students will compare online tools to one another, as well as to ‘live’ museum exhibits, and note the strengths and challenges presented by the formats. Additionally, students will learn more about visual art content through the critical analysis process, an important tool for artists, critics, and curators alike.

UNIT THREE

Jobs in Museum Studies

Essential Question: How do museum professionals interact within a community?

  • In this unit, students will begin by examining both the variety of museum careers, and which museum careers might particularly appeal to them. After this, students will consider both how museums function as communities in and of themselves, and how museums serve the wider communities they exist within. Students will look at examples of these community interactions at the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, and the former Museum of Inuit Art.

UNIT FOUR

Looking At Real Exhibits

 

Essential Question: What are the elements of successful exhibit design?

  • In this unit, students will reactivate their knowledge of marketing, and consider how museums reach (or fail to reach) different audiences. Students will also return to the realm of online museum content, this time through online exhibits. Students will compare exhibits and comment upon the strengths and weaknesses of the different presentation formats. Students will take a deeper look at the role of graphic design in communicating to audiences, as well.

CULMINATING PROJECT

15% of Final Grade

  • This project is one of the final evaluations of IDC4U Museum Studies online. This project will give students an opportunity to apply all the learning they have done over the course and is worth 15% of the final grade.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

15% of Final Grade

 

  • This exam is the final evaluation of IDC4U Museum Studies online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours. 

IDC4U INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:

PASSION PROJECTS – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: Any University or University/College preparation course

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

CREDIT CROSSOVER: Although Interdisciplinary Studies courses focus on different subject matter, the IDC4U course code can only count as one credit on a student’s transcript, even if multiple courses are taken. For example, a student that has completed IDC4U – Artificial Intelligence and IDC4U – The Elite Athlete will only earn one credit in total on their final transcript. Each course (along with the final grade) will show, however, a credit value of zero will be applied to the second IDC4U course. This also applies to students using IDC4U as one of their top six marks when applying to university; one only course may be used as an achieved credit out of the six.

UNIT ONE

Academic Research

Essential Question: How can I develop effective research and writing skills that are suitable for the post-secondary world?

 

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to effective and meaningful methods of research in a new, digital age. Gone is the reliance on books, and thoughtful and insightful online research is in. Students will explore how we evaluate online resources, how to properly cite material using the Chicago Manual of Style, and develop the building blocks for stronger analytical and written skills.

UNIT TWO

Passion Project Proposal

Essential Question: How can I further develop my own academic interests and find resources to support my future career goals?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the various MOOCs (Massively Open Online Courses) that make up the IDC4U course. Students will make connections between their work in this course and their academic and career-related interests, and help develop strong pathways to post-secondary school. Students will also explore the concept of breadth requirements at the post-secondary level and work to develop a broader range and understanding of ideas that exist in academia. Finally, students will work to create projects that are tied to the three MOOC module units that make up this course and to the final assessment piece.

UNIT THREE

MOOC Module 1: Math and Science

Essential Question: Create your own Math and Science MOOC module essential question

  • In this module, students will begin to explore their first selected MOOC module, this focusing on math and science-related topics. While students are expected to dedicate the 25 hours of contact learning to the MOOC course, they will also have a number of check-in pieces within the D2L learning platform. Students will be expected to complete a number of discussion forum postings, a video seminar, a Padlet, and complete a one-page summary handout of the major concepts and topics that they learned in their courses. In the MOOCs, there are also a number of opportunities to engage in formative assessment activities, where students can test themselves on the content to demonstrate their understanding of the concepts and materials; students will be expected to report back on their evaluation results. Finally, students will begin to make connections between the material content and their future academic and career aspirations and goals.

UNIT FOUR

MOOC Module 2: Arts and Humanities

Essential Question: Create your own Arts and Humanities MOOC module essential question

  • In this module, students will begin to explore their second selected MOOC module, this focusing on arts and humanities related topics. While students are expected to dedicate the 25 hours of contact learning to the MOOC course, they will also have a number of check-in pieces within the D2L learning platform. Students will be expected to complete a number of discussion forum postings, a video seminar, a Padlet, and complete a one-page summary handout of the major concepts and topics that they learned in their courses. In the MOOCs, there are also a number of opportunities to engage in formative assessment activities, where students can test themselves on the content to demonstrate their understanding of the concepts and materials; students will be expected to report back on their evaluation results. Finally, students will begin to make connections between the material content and their future academic and career aspirations and goals.

UNIT FIVE

MOOC Module 3: Government and Society

Essential Question: Create your own Government and Society MOOC module essential question

  • In this module, students will begin to explore their final selected MOOC module, this focusing on government and society related topics. While students are expected to dedicate the 25 hours of contact learning to the MOOC course, they will also have a number of check-in pieces within the D2L learning platform. Students will be expected to complete a number of discussion forum postings, a video seminar, a Padlet, and complete a one-page summary handout of the major concepts and topics that they learned in their courses. In the MOOCs, there are also a number of opportunities to engage in formative assessment activities, where students can test themselves on the content to demonstrate their understanding of the concepts and materials; students will be expected to report back on their evaluation results. Finally, students will begin to make connections between the material content and their future academic and career aspirations and goals.

CULMINATING PROJECT

30% of Final Grade

  • This project is the final evaluation of IDC4U Passion Projects. This project will challenge students to use all concepts learned throughout this course and is worth 30% of the final grade.

LVV4U CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION – GRADE 12

 

PREREQUISITE: English, Grade 10, Academic, or Classical Languages, Level 2, University Preparation

GRADE: 12 (University)

AVAILABILITY: WISS Online

LVV4U online introduces students to the rich cultural legacy of the Classical world and encourages them to make connections between antiquity and other societies and to their own personal experiences. Students will investigate such aspects of Classical culture as its mythology and literature, art, architecture, philosophy, science, and technology, as well as elements of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. By reading Classical authors in English translation and examining material culture brought to light through archaeology, students will enhance both their communication skills and their ability to think critically and creatively. In LVV4U online, students will also be encouraged to be culturally sensitive, independent learners who appreciate the interconnectedness of ancient and modern societies and who will be able to apply this understanding to their future endeavours.

UNIT ONE

Prehistory & Bronze Age Greece

Essential Question: What were the major characteristics of Bronze Age Aegean civilizations and what are the major archaeological discoveries that contribute to our understanding of these civilizations?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the prehistoric world of Bronze Age Greece, exploring the various factors that shaped the beginnings of the Greek world until the so-called Dark Age. Special attention will be paid to the influence of the landscape and of other Near Eastern civilizations on the early Greeks. Students will be introduced to the Greek warrior civilization of the Mycenaeans, and to their precursors, the mysterious Minoans from Crete. Students will explore these prehistoric beginnings through the lens of archaeology, art, geography and mythology.

UNIT TWO

Archaic Greece

Essential Question: In what ways did the Archaic Age lay the groundwork for the later advancements and innovations of Classical Greece? How do these changes continue to resonate in our world today?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the period of ancient Greece known to historians as the Archaic Age. It is a fascinating period defined by radical change, instability and innovation in almost every aspect of Greek culture and society, including politics, art, architecture and religion. Students will begin by looking at Homer’s epics The Iliad and The Odyssey, the oldest writings of the Western world, before touching on the emergence of key aspects of Greek culture, such as the Olympic games, Greek philosophy and experiments in democracy. Most importantly, the Archaic Age sets the stage for Classical Greece, the height of Greek civilization.

UNIT THREE

Classical Greece

Essential Question: What is the cultural, philosophical, political, and historical legacy of the Classical Age of Greece?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the height of ancient Greek civilization, a period known to all later generations as the Classical Age. It is during this period that the earlier innovations and experiments of Greek culture flourish. Beginning with an overview of the Persian War, students will then explore the birth of democracy, Greek tragedy, classical sculpture and architecture, and the philosophy of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Students will also look at the tensions and conflicts underlying these great accomplishments, including the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the resulting spread of Greek civilization across the entire Mediterranean world and beyond.

UNIT FOUR

The Roman Republic

Essential Question: How did the Roman Republic begin, both mythologically and historically? What political, religious and social institutions defined the early Roman Republic?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the development of the Roman Republic and its eventual growth as a dominant force in the Mediterranean world. Students will begin by looking at the Etruscan civilization and explore its influence on Roman society and culture. They will then turn to the birth of the republic itself, focusing on its political and religious institutions, works of art and literature. Students will then investigate the events and figures that led to the collapse of the Republic, with special attention to the life and death of Julius Caesar, as well as the chaotic aftermath of his assassination.

UNIT FIVE

The Roman Empire

Essential Question: What were the main causes of the fall of the Roman Empire? What were the consequences of this fall for later Western civilization? What is the legacy of the Roman Empire on the contemporary world?

  • In this unit, students will be introduced to the fascinating history and legacy of the Roman Empire. Beginning with the emergence of Augustus as the first emperor of Rome, students will explore the age of classical Rome, the Pax Romana, and investigate the classical art, architecture and literature of this period. Students will look at the lives of the emperors, the expansion of the empire across the majority of the European continent, and the changing social and cultural realities of this civilization as it moves from its classical age to its eventual decline and fall. Throughout the unit, students will critically assess the legacy of the Roman Empire and its accomplishments in today’s modern world.

FINAL EXAM

Proctored Exam

30% of Final Grade

 

  • This exam is the final evaluation of LVV4U online. Students need to arrange their final exam 10 days in advance. All coursework should be completed and submitted before writing the final exam, please be advised that once the exam is written, any outstanding coursework will be given a grade of zero. The exam will be two hours.

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